Recent Changes

Thursday, August 18

  1. page When Asia was the World edited ... Ibn Batutta came from a family of judges. Throughout his life, he traveled everywhere from Afr…
    ...
    Ibn Batutta came from a family of judges. Throughout his life, he traveled everywhere from Africa, India and the Philippines to South East Asia and the Middle East. Overall, this was more than 73,000 miles. During his travels, he received his wealth from many notable people.He traveled during the time of the Black Plague when Islam controlled most of Africa and both {http://cdncache-a.akamaihd.net/items/it/img/arrow-10x10.png} and India Ocean trade were flourishing.Along the way, he studied, made contacts, and took part in the robes ceremony.He saw the connection between religion and trade, loved travel, and had a passion for religious learning.
    Chapter 7: Treaure and Treaty: Ma Huan, 1413-1431 CE
    ...
    was to docuentdocument the lives
    Chapter 7: Treasure and Treaty: Ma Huan, 1413-1431 CE (C Period: Malloury and Abby)
    This chapter follows Ma Huan on his journey throughout the Indian Ocean trade networks. He served as a translator of foreign documents on the fourth imperial Ming Chinese expedition. He was a 32 year old Muslim from Hangzhou, which is a large trading port south of Nanjing. On the trip he wrote a memoir that included fresh observation and a high attention to detail, setting him apart from other writers and explorers at that time. He noted thing such as dress, costume, and lifestyles and compared them to China so that his readers could understand the difference between the cultures. The fleet he embarked on was also known a a fleet of tresure ships because of the large amount of Chinse goods, trade, and tribute. The fleet intended to spread trade and diplomatic dominance and awe local and regional states in a non-violent way. The first stop was in Champa, which is modern-day Vietnam. The fleet sailed down the Southwest coast of China for 10 days and then they landed in Champa. The king was a firm believer in Buddhism and Ma Huan noted the use of robes to mark rank in nobility. Also, there was harsh law and no paper, so the people used pounded bark and goat skin. The desired trade items from China were silk products and beads. The next stop was Java, where Ma Huan noticed the dress of the people in particular. The king wore a silk wrap at the waist and all men carried a dagger at the waist. Java was the first resident Chinese community overseas, called Tu-Pan, holding over a thousand families. It held close trade ties to Fujian. The port was founded and run by oversea Chinese and was a destination of trade because of the abundance in wealth. The N. Java coast was one big kingdom with smaller ports within. Muslims, Chinese, Hindus, and Buddhists dominated the area. From Java, they sailed North along the East coast of the Malayan Penninsula, to Ayuthia, which is modern-day Thailand. Here, Ma Huan noted that the Thai Buddist monks were similar to the Chinese Buddhist monastic tradition. They differed because of the split between Hinayana and Manayana Buddhism. After that the fleet sailed to Malacca which is modern-day {http://cdncache-a.akamaihd.net/items/it/img/arrow-10x10.png} . It was a rising port between the Indian Ocean and Southeast Asia. The past king had visite the Ming Empire and the king had converted to Islam. The fleet left collected tribute and traded goods in Malacca to come back for. From there the fleet divided, splitting into groups going to either Bengal, Africa, or India. Sri Lanka and the Maldives came next. In Sri Lanka there was a conversion of coinage, weights, and measures. Previous fleets had attacked when they refused tribute, so the king was willing to pay the tribute this time. In the Maldive Islands, shells were used as coinage and coconut husks were used to make rope. At the time of Ibn Battuta, women only covered their bottom halves, but when Ma Huan arrived things had changed, women being completely covered due to Islamic modesty. Relations of the fleet to kings and traders of ports was formal. To determine pricing, they examined the goods, set a date to determine pricing, and then once the prices were determined, they never changed. The Chinese court had plans for long-term domination, so was there mutual benefit for conquored peoples? Well, with soldiers stationed in the port, ports had no choice but to surrender, but there was Chinese support against external enemies and family rivals of the kings. However, fleets came sporatically throughout the years, so their promise of protection was rarely filled. When Ma Huan's fleet returned to China there were high taxes, internal unrest, and Mongol threats. Later on there were edicts passed to first reverse the policy of the fleets, then to burn all records of the fleets, and finally to end all foreign trade, forcing coastal dwellers to move inland.
    (view changes)

Wednesday, April 22

  1. page When Asia was the World edited ... {Xuanzang's travels.kmz} Egypt news ... of religious doctrine.” doctrine” He entered …
    ...
    {Xuanzang's travels.kmz}
    Egypt news
    ...
    of religious doctrine.”doctrine” He entered
    At age 26, he became dissatisfied; he did not know which doctrine to follow from the many different [[@search.conduit.com/Results.aspx?ctid=CT3327490&searchsource=55&UM=2&q=Buddhist|Buddhist]] schools. He decided to travel west to the center of [[@search.conduit.com/Results.aspx?ctid=CT3327490&searchsource=55&UM=2&q=Buddhism|Buddhism]] to clear his doubts. The Tang government forbade commoners to travel west, so his journey was illegal and the government circulated warrant for arrest. Along the way, his two companions and guide deserted him and, he faced difficult roads with hot winds and sand. He was given provisions at government tower after being left alone for three days without food or water. Although he was supposed to have been taken back to his monastery, the head sentry at the tower was [[@search.conduit.com/Results.aspx?ctid=CT3327490&searchsource=55&UM=2&q=Buddhist|Buddhist]] and ignored the government request for his capture. Xuanzang received a royal escort from King Qu-wentai of [[@search.conduit.com/Results.aspx?ctid=CT3327490&searchsource=55&UM=2&q=Taklamakan Desert|Taklamakan Desert]] he was a notable teacher wherever he went. He traveled north of [[@search.conduit.com/Results.aspx?ctid=CT3327490&searchsource=55&UM=2&q=Taklamakan Desert|Taklamakan Desert]] to Lake Issy Kul. The king at the lake honored him with 30 silk robes. Silk and grain were universally accepted currency between [[@search.conduit.com/Results.aspx?ctid=CT3327490&searchsource=55&UM=2&q=China|China]] and nomads. The royal meal was sugar from [[@search.conduit.com/Results.aspx?ctid=CT3327490&searchsource=55&UM=2&q=India|India]] and rice from China. He went west through Turkic, Mongolian, and [[@search.conduit.com/Results.aspx?ctid=CT3327490&searchsource=55&UM=2&q=Uighur|Uighur]] regions. He followed [[@search.conduit.com/Results.aspx?ctid=CT3327490&searchsource=55&UM=2&q=Amudarya River|Amudarya River]] upstream, and then went southeast to [[@search.conduit.com/Results.aspx?ctid=CT3327490&searchsource=55&UM=2&q=Balkh|Balkh]] and Afghanistan. He went east into [[@search.conduit.com/Results.aspx?ctid=CT3327490&searchsource=55&UM=2&q=Kashmir|Kashmir]] and the valleys of Himalayas. Wherever he went he left his mark: he listened to teachings, worshipped, and debated doctrine. He crossed [[@search.conduit.com/Results.aspx?ctid=CT3327490&searchsource=55&UM=2&q=Himalayas|Himalayas]] to get to [[@search.conduit.com/Results.aspx?ctid=CT3327490&searchsource=55&UM=2&q=India|India]] and found many flourishing monasteries, but also many ancient sites that were deserted. He stayed for a total of 7 years. He studied, copied manuscripts, listened to teachings, participated in rituals and discussions, and visited [[@search.conduit.com/Results.aspx?ctid=CT3327490&searchsource=55&UM=2&q=Buddhist|Buddhist]] sites. He decided to return to [[@search.conduit.com/Results.aspx?ctid=CT3327490&searchsource=55&UM=2&q=China|China]] to explain what he had learned. He brought back 657 {http://cdncache-a.akamaihd.net/items/it/img/arrow-10x10.png} , relics, statues, plants, and seeds. He apologized to the emperor for leaving illegally and was forgiven and provided with imperial escort.
    Xuanzang's total travels added to 1500 miles and still within institutional support of Buddhism. His pilgrimage set off diplomatic missions between China and India and both sides learned trade possibilities. Foreigners were welcomed in the imperial capital and influenced fashions of time. He was asked to become high official, but chose to stay a Buddhist monk. He supervised a team of translators and taught Buddhist texts in Chang’an. He designed and helped build a library for texts until the end of his life.
    (view changes)

Thursday, October 17

  1. page When Asia was the World edited Capture His Heart and Make Him Love You Forever {http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-xq0GMxI9D6Y/UTaYEmLy…

    Capture His Heart and Make Him Love You Forever
    {http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-xq0GMxI9D6Y/UTaYEmLykBI/AAAAAAAAAYk/ka5B36ssWsc/s1600/chh-package_325.jpg}
    When Asia was the world
    Post a short synopsis of each chapter including lessons related to migration and trade. Also, feel free to post links to related resources and news articles.
    Chapter 1: Monasteries and Monarchs
    (view changes)

Thursday, September 19

  1. page Movies edited ... Run Time: 94 minutes ASIN: B00005JLD4 Watch Once Upon A Time Season 1 Episode 10 Online Wa…
    ...
    Run Time: 94 minutes
    ASIN: B00005JLD4
    Watch Once Upon A Time Season 1 Episode 10 Online
    Watch House Season 8 Episode 9 Online
    Watch Gossip Girl Season 5 Episode 12 Online

    (view changes)
    7:27 pm

Saturday, September 14

  1. page When Asia was the World edited ... {Xuanzang google map.kmz} {Xuanzang's travels.kmz} Egypt news Xuanzang grew up a young …
    ...
    {Xuanzang google map.kmz}
    {Xuanzang's travels.kmz}
    Egypt news
    Xuanzang grew up a young monk reading classical texts and was “deeply given to the study of religious doctrine.” He entered monastery in Luoyang at 13. Xuanzang studied, listened, & meditated for 7 years until he was forced to flee with his brother and went to Chengdu. In 623, he defied older brother in Chengdu and left their monastery to travel and hear oral teachings. He left Chengdu and sailed down the Yangtze River to a famous monastery. He then traveled north through Henan, attended lectures, preached, and gained fame.
    At age 26, he became dissatisfied; he did not know which doctrine to follow from the many different Buddhist schools. He decided to travel west to the center of Buddhism to clear his doubts. The Tang government forbade commoners to travel west, so his journey was illegal and the government circulated warrant for arrest. Along the way, his two companions and guide deserted him and, he faced difficult roads with hot winds and sand. He was given provisions at government tower after being left alone for three days without food or water. Although he was supposed to have been taken back to his monastery, the head sentry at the tower was Buddhist and ignored the government request for his capture. Xuanzang received a royal escort from King Qu-wentai of Taklamakan Desert he was a notable teacher wherever he went. He traveled north of Taklamakan Desert to Lake Issy Kul. The king at the lake honored him with 30 silk robes. Silk and grain were universally accepted currency between China and nomads. The royal meal was sugar from India and rice from China. He went west through Turkic, Mongolian, and Uighur regions. He followed Amudarya River upstream, and then went southeast to Balkh and Afghanistan. He went east into Kashmir and the valleys of Himalayas. Wherever he went he left his mark: he listened to teachings, worshipped, and debated doctrine. He crossed Himalayas to get to India and found many flourishing monasteries, but also many ancient sites that were deserted. He stayed for a total of 7 years. He studied, copied manuscripts, listened to teachings, participated in rituals and discussions, and visited Buddhist sites. He decided to return to China to explain what he had learned. He brought back 657 books, relics, statues, plants, and seeds. He apologized to the emperor for leaving illegally and was forgiven and provided with imperial escort.
    (view changes)

Monday, July 1

Sunday, June 2

  1. page home edited NOTE TO PRIMARY AUTHORS: You probably want to remove the porn links that somebody posted in the …

    NOTE TO PRIMARY AUTHORS: You probably want to remove the porn links that somebody posted in the menu!
    {immigration_banner.jpg}
    {http://i1087.photobucket.com/albums/j464/mariashivers2674/foot-problems.gif} Welcome to the Land of Hope Project,
    (view changes)
  2. page home edited ... 16. All schools donate their funds toward the charity and/or toward implementing the action pl…
    ...
    16. All schools donate their funds toward the charity and/or toward implementing the action plan. - global domains international review
    Getting Started:
    ...
    Cooper at coopert@thewalkerschool.org.Κατασκευή Ιστοσελίδων
    Γυαλιά Ηλίου
    SEO
    Adult SEO Company
    Adult SEO
    coopert@thewalkerschool.org.
    (view changes)

More